Fitness

Check the Arena Part Shape Fitness to Meet Modern Needs

Catherine F. Wagner 

“We don’t stop playing because we’re getting old. We’re getting old because we stop playing.”


George Bernard Shaw

In the world of voyeurism, where posts, comments and retweets indicate an “active” presence, more than ever, they are overweight, depressed and have difficulty maintaining body vitality or exercising. As automation gains momentum, a Wall-E dystopia with robotic, passive and perpetual consumers is becoming more likely.

Human labor may gradually become less necessary, and the human body is becoming an increasingly popular relic of bygone eras. The meaning of life becomes the satisfaction of the impulse-saturation in comfort and the elimination of any pain. In a world where we are not needed, narcissism and hedonism become the main instructions for action, but only to the detriment of us, people.

Humanity cannot be achieved without a goal. We must be capable, bodily active, well-fed, cleansed of suffering, connected with nature and, above all, useful for a cause greater than ourselves. We need a mission, and we need a tribe.

The fitness and education industry emerged from these needs. As civilization developed, more and more people experienced deterioration of the human body, and after industrialization, the human mind. Meaningless work at the factory led to a higher level of alcoholism and body inactivity.

Gyms and men’s clubs have sprung up in communities to counter the appeal of bars. Factory owners hired readers to read workbooks and newspapers to stimulate their minds, and most importantly, companies began to create sports leagues to meet the needs of the body and emotions.

For example, Gene Staleys Corn Manufacturing company hired a young enthusiast George Halas to create its corporate football team Decatur Staleys. Staley was terrorized by local industrial brigades such as the Moline Universal Tractors and the Champaign Legion.

Following the vision of Halas, this small league organized and developed structures, schedules and standards that eventually allowed them to grow and attract the best talent. Eventually, this small team moved to Chicago, where it changed its name to Bears.

“It’s good that the debate is so terrible, otherwise we would have liked it too much.”


Robert E. Lee

The origins of our most profitable professional sports league began with a simple human need. Without the demands of debate or the survival of nomads, the human mind needed opportunities for self-organization in the performance of common tasks.

Today, these needs are more predictable than ever, but competitive team sports are much less accessible for development. As family life is increasingly defined by the rapid pace and free time dominated by screens, our communities are becoming more fragmented, and people are increasingly moving away from their nature.

Restore health in an unusual place

In the winter of 2013, five of my best friends and I booked a five-day All-inclusive trip to Riviera Maya, Mexico. I was 23 years old and I thought that the idea of the beach, the sun and all the food and drinks I wanted was as close as possible to five perfect days. There would have been ten of them: four older men with wives and another older man, a bachelor like me at the time, who would have turned out to be a great roommate.

In the months leading up to the trip, my friends and I were full of anticipation. They started joining me at daily group training sessions, where former athletes who were out of shape restored their beach-ready bodies and enjoyed the energy and diligence that accompanied this process.

If obstacles prevented learning, everyone found a way. There was a group goal and responsibility to get the most out of everyone. When the trip arrived, they lost weight, and many developed a habit that they keep to this day.

We arrived in Mexico in July, and it was everything we had ever dreamed of, and even more. For five days, boys and girls from Texas owned this complex. A friend of a friend, in particular, my Brochacho, joined me when we immediately switched to a five-day regime:

  • Wake up at 8am and head out for this delicious outdoor breakfast buffet on the beach. Have a coffee and read the newspaper for an hour.
  • Head to the gym at 9 a.m. to work out in the rocking chair (whoever I am) or ride a bike. Away from the obligatory workouts, we started the day with them because they gave us energy for the whole day.
  • At 10 o’clock in the morning, you will take first-class seats by the pool and visit the bar, not paying attention to the food after the workout.
  • At 11 o’clock in the morning we started the first crazy games every day!
  • At 17 o’clock, come back and get ready for dinner.
  • The station was staffed by event attendants, led by a charismatic man named J.C. Every day, shortly before 11 a.m., he would start berating people for participating in the first crazy game of the day. Usually these were awesome and inherently fun competitions, such as football kick competitions, Simon Said’s big dance, a relay race in the pool and a tug of war on a kayak.

The games served to make the usual competitive juices flow in the pool, and immediately turned into traditional team sports games, such as pool volleyball, sand volleyball or water polo in shallow water.


Photograph by Bev Childress from Fort Worth, Texas

Apart from the short food breaks, we played constantly during these five days. At each competition, the teams peacefully gathered together, set the rules, and then took off their gloves. You are immersed in a new world.

“The misconception about very successful cultures is that they are happy and carefree places. That’s not usually the point. They are energetic and purposeful, but deep down their members are less focused on happiness than on solving complex problems together. This task includes many moments of open feedback, an unpleasant discovery of the truth when you are faced with a gap between where the group is and where it should be””

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Fitness

Check the Arena Part Shape Fitness to Meet Modern Needs

“We don’t stop playing because we’re getting old. We’re getting old because we stop playing.” George Bernard Shaw In the world of voyeurism, where posts, comments and retweets indicate an “active” presence, more than ever, they are overweight, depressed and have difficulty maintaining body vitality or exercising. As automation gains momentum, a Wall-E dystopia with […]

Catherine F. Wagner 

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